SOME AREAS OF FRANCIS MARION NATIONAL FOREST HAVE BEEN SET ASIDE AS WILDERNESS AREAS TO
PROTECT THE AMAZING DIVERSITY OF LIFE IN THESE SOUTHERN SWAMPS. THE WILDLIFE HERE IS TRULY
AMAZING. IN THE SUMMER THE BUGS ARE INTOLERABLE, SO VISITING IN THE FALL AND SPRING IS
RECOMMENDED. SEVERAL HIKING AND BACKPACKING TRAILS ARE MAINTAINED IN THE FOREST.
PICTURES FROM SOUTH CAROLINA
METROPOLITAN NATURALIST
This snake-like animal is actually a lizard. Called a Glass Lizard because when the lizard is grabbed the tail breaks off, sometimes
shattering into several pieces. On close examination ear holes can be seen on the side of the lizard's head. These external ears
separate the lizards from the snakes. Lizards also have movable eyelids, while snakes have a non-movable clear cover over their
eyes. The movable eyelids and ear holes of the lizards are more easily seen on the pictures of the Anole Lizard below.
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The Green Anole is often called the chameleon because it changes from green to brown,
although technically the chameleons are a completely unrelated group of lizards that are not
native to the United States. The color change might help with thermoregulation, the lizard turns
brown when cold to absorb heat from the sun more effectively. The color also may turn to brown
when the lizard is stressed.
OW! OW! OW!
It didn't really hurt much. The tiny teeth are good for holding their insect prey, but are not very useful for defending themselves
against humans armed with cameras.
Anoles are adept climbers. They are often found on trees, walls, and window panes.
The male Anole has a colorful throat fan that he displays to threaten other males that enter his territory, or in the
case of the lizard below, to tell photographers to keep away.
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