MORE FLOWERING PLANTS OF THE METRO AREA
METROPOLITAN NATURALIST
METROPOLITAN NATURALIST
MORE FLOWERING PLANTS
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Little Sweet Betsy (Trilium cuneatum)
Little Sweet Betsy (Trillium cuneatum)

Photographed in April 1983 at Cylburn Park. This Trillium is a native early spring
wildflower. The Little Sweet Betsy is found in undisturbed woods, a habitat that is
rapidly disappearing. There are about 40 recognised species of Trillium, of which
about a dozen are found in the Baltimore - Washington DC area.
Yellow Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris) at Lake Roland, April, 1983
Yellow Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris) at Lake Roland, April, 1983
Yellow Marsh Marigold (Caltha palustris)

A native early spring wildflower. The Marsh Marigold is found in wet soil
and marshy areas, often alongside streams. The photographs at left
were taken at Lake Roland in April, 1983.
Burdock

Burdock was brought to the New World by early settlers for use as a
vegetable and medicine. It has established itself as a weed in open areas
that are infrequently mowed. The large burs that follow the purple flowers
in late summer and fall are tenacious, clinging to clothes and hair . In its
native Europe, Burdock has a long history of medicinal and food use.
Dr.
Fernie discusses some of the traditional uses in his 1897 herbal HERBAL
SIMPLES APPROVED FOR MODERN USES OF CURE, including
treatment for skin disease and as a general tonic. Today Burdock root can
be bought at natural food stores and supermarkets, often mixed with
Dandelion Root as a general cleansing tonic.
Daylilly (Hemerocallis sp.)
Day-lily (Hemerocallis sp.)

The day-lily flower lasts for one day, hence the name day-lily. The
Common Orange Day-lily (Hemerocallis fulva) was introduced from Asia
as a garden flower and has established itself as an invasive weed.
Several species of day-lily with numerous varieties are grown as
ornamental garden flowers and are also seen growing where they have
established themselves around old gardens and in open areas.
Queen Anne's-Lace or Wild Carrot (Daucus carota)

Queen Anne's-Lace was introduced to the New World from Europe and
has established itself as a weed in fields and open areas. The wild
Queen Anne's Lace is the ancestor of our vegetable carrot which was
selectively bred for larger and more colorful roots. The root of the wild
variety is usually thinner and white in color, but has the familiar carrot
smell and taste. If you collect these to eat do not confuse it with some of
the similar but highly poisonous relatives, such as Poison Hemlock
(
Conium maculatum) and Water-Hemlock (Cicuta maculata), and Fool's
Parsley (Aethusa cynapium). Interestingly Poison Hemlock and Fool's
Parsley were also brought the New World from Europe, possibly as
medicinal and ceremonial herbs. See Dr. Fernie's discussion of
Hemlock
(with mention of Water-Hemlock) in his 1897 herbal HERBAL SIMPLES
APPROVED FOR MODERN USES OF CURE.

Traditional
medicinal uses of carrot are also discussed by Dr. Fernie n
his 1897 herbal HERBAL SIMPLES APPROVED FOR MODERN USES
OF CURE.